A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

Other Animals     2022年09月05日

A tiny bird with a face full of flame, contrasting beautifully against a suit of emerald green.

Meet the Flame-faced Tanager

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

The flame-faced tanager (Tangara parzudakii), is a species of bird in the Thraupidae family. Sporting a bright orange forehead and cheeks which turn to yellow on the rest of the head. He also has a black throat and ear patch. The upperparts are black with a greenish-yellow shoulder patch and yellow and green-buff rump.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

The chest and belly are also green, turning to rufous further down.

Female members of this species look similar to the males, though their heads tend to be not quite as bright.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

This bird is found in parts of the Andes of Colombia, Ecuador, Venezeuala, and Peru.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

These birds can be found at elevations of 1,200-2,500 m, within forested areas or at the edges of forested areas, or clearings.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

Like many other managers, this species eats a wide variety of fruits and insects. They tend to forage along horizontal, moss-coated branches, probing for insects.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

Little is known about the breeding habits of Flame-faced tanager, other than they nest in open habitats such as pastures or forest edges. And that parents regularly probe the nesting material around their chicks. This is thought to help remove fleas and other parasites from the nest, protecting chicks.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

A common species throughout its range Flame-faced tanager is listed at Least Concern on the IUCN list.

A Face Full Of Fiery Oranges And Yellows Contrasts Perfectly With A Buff Suit Flecked Through With Glittering Emerald Green

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